The Joint Program in Linguistics and Anthropology

at the University of Arizona

The University of Arizona offers a Ph.D. program in Anthropology and Linguistics. The program makes it possible for students to pursue the study of language and linguistic theory drawing on the resources of both the Linguistics Department and the linguistic anthropology program within the Anthropology Department, without having to go through two separate Ph.D. programs.

Both departments have extremely strong national reputations for their contributions to the study of language, and each department has specialized in mutually compatible ways in the kinds of linguistic theory and analysis it offers students. The Linguistics Department has given priority to formal models of language structure. Linguistic anthropology, as one of the four subdisciplines of anthropology, has concentrated on developing the study of language in its social context, both in sociolinguistics and historical linguistics, with particularly strong links with cultural anthropology. Furthermore, both departments have specialized in Southwestern Native American languages and cultures, a particularly attractive and accessible area of study. Scholars from both departments have also carried out research on numerous other languages.

The joint degree in Anthropology and Linguistics is designed for students with interests in both departments who would emerge from the program as job candidates for both linguistics and anthropology departments.

Both the Anthropology and Linguistics Departments offer Teaching Assistantships and some research support which would be available to students of the joint Ph.D. program.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

The Department of Anthropology is establishing a new core curriculum. Each student, including joint program students, will be required to take two semesters of the interdisciplinary core course. In addition, the following courses are required in Linguistic Anthropology: Either Anthro 576 (Language and Culture) or Anthro 583 (Sociolinguistics), plus one of the following: Anthro 577 (Discourse and Text), Anthro 679 (Language and Ethnography) or Anthro 580 (Historical Linguistics).

Required courses in Linguistics are Linguistics 501 (Formal Foundations), 503 (Syntax I), 510, 514 (Foundations of Phonological Theory 1, II), 504 (Syntax II) or 505 (Extended Categorial Grammar), and two additional courses from the following list: 522 (Linguistic Semantics and Lexicology), 535 (Morphology), 544 (Typology), 564 (Formal Semantics), 515 (Phonetics).

Additional courses, including at least two seminars in the area of specialization, are to be selected for a total of 60 units. Other requirements are a demonstration of knowledge of statistics and a study or knowledge of a nonöIndo-European language.

Students will select a major and minor area of specialization (e.g., Sociolinguistics; HistoricalöComparative Linguistics; Narrative and Discourse; Areal Specialization; A Language or Language Family Specialization; Cultural Semantics; Language Acquisition and Socialization; Phonology; Morphology; Syntax; Language Processing; etc.).

THE FACULTY

Diana Archangeli (Ph.D. MIT 1984) Professor of Linguistics. Research interests in phonology and phonetics. In phonology, focus on feature interaction and distribution; also templatic morphology systems. In phonetics, curious about the physical articulation of phonological representations, especially where the perceived sound does not unambiguously match the sound posited phonologically.

Selected publications:

Ellen B. Basso (Ph.D. University of Chicago, 1969) Professor of Anthropology. Research Interests: Language and culture of the Kalapalo of Brazil, and of the Northern Athapaskans.

Selected publications:

Andrew Carnie (Ph.D., MIT, 1995) Assistant Professor of Linguistics. Research Interests: Theoretical Syntax, Predication, Phrase Structure, Verb-initial languages, Celtic, Mayan, Endangered Languages.

Selected Publications:

Dick Demers (Ph.D. University of Washington, 1968) Professor of Linguistics. Research interests: instrumental phonetics; phonology; syntax/typology. Favorite languages: Lummi in particular, Salish family in general; Native American languages, especially those of the Southwest.

Selected publications:

Michael Hammond (Ph.D. UCLA, 1984) Professor of Linguistics. Research interests in phonology and morphology. In phonology, focus on the theory of stress and accent. Worked on other domains of phonological theory including autosegmental theory and templatic systems. In morphology, focus on inflectional systems and the theory of affixation. Also interested in poetic meter, psycholinguistics, computational linguistics, learnability theory, and historical change.

Selected publications:

Jane H. Hill (Ph.D. UCLA, 1966) Regents' Professor of Anthropology and Linguistics. Research Interests: Native American languages (especially sociolinguistics), language and racism, language and political economy, narrative and discourse.

Selected publications:

Simin Karimi (Ph.D. University of Washington, 1989) Associate Professor of Linguistics. Research interests: Syntax, The Interface of Syntax and Semantics, Typology, Universals, Iranian Linguistics.

Selected publications:

D. Terence Langendoen (Ph.D. 1964, MIT). Professor of Linguistics. Research interests: syntactic and semantic theory, and natural language processing, both by people and by computers. I have been involved for the past several years in a project with Eloise Jelinek to develop pedagogic grammars and other teaching materials for Yaqui, and am interested in the problem of developing standards for archiving texts, dictionaries and grammars of endangered languages. I have been since 1997 the editor of Linguistics Abstracts.

Selected publications:

Norma Mendoza-Denton (Ph.D., Stanford, 1997, Linguistics) Assistant Professor of Linguistic Anthropology. Research Interests: Sociolinguistic variation, Language and Gender, Language and Ethnicity.

Selected Publications:

Susan U. Philips (Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania, 1974) Professor of Anthropology. Research interests: ideology in discourse, language and law, gender and language

Selected Publications:

Mary Willie (Ph.D. University of Arizona, 1991) Associate Professor of Linguistics. Research Interests: syntactic properties of Navajo, obviation, and discourse anaphora. Other interest is the development of multi-media Navajo teaching materials.

Selected publications:

Ofelia Zepeda (Ph.D. University of Arizona 1984). Professor of Linguistics. Several research projects on the Tohono O'odham language: developing materials suitable for studying and teaching the language, conducting a comprehensive dialect survey, and creating a contemporary Tohono O'odham literature.

Selected publications:

Emeritus Faculty

Eloise Jelinek (Ph.D. University of Arizona, 1981) Adjunct Associate Professor of Linguistics. Research Interests: syntax and semantics, language universals and typology; Native American Languages.

Selected Publications:

Adrienne Lehrer (Ph.D. University of Rochester, 1968. Professor Emerita of Linguistics. Research Interests: the organization of the lexicon and types of lexical-semantic relations. Worked on analyses of antonymy and polysemy among other kinds of semantic relations and has applied semantic field theory on a variety of semantic domains, such as cooking words, wine descriptors, emotion words, classifiers, and verbs of speaking. Recent work has been devoted to word-formation in English, especially the less well-studied constructions, such as blends and combining forms.

Selected publications:

AFFILIATED FACULTY

Muriel Saville-Troike (Ph.D. University of Texas 1968, Linguistics) Professor of English. Research Interests: First and second language acquisition (especially Navajo and Chinese), language attrition, contrastive rhetoric.

Selected Publications:

Rudolph C. Troike (PhD University of Texas [Austin], 1959) Professor of English. Research interests: Syntactic universals, especially WH-phenomena, and typological universals; American Indian languages, especially northern Mexico and Texas; American English; Chinese and Korean syntax; History of English grammatical analysis.

Selected publications:

THE SETTING

The University of Arizona is located in Tucson, an ethnically varied city of over 600,000 in the Sonoran Desert of southeastern Arizona. At an altitude of approximately 2,500 feet, it is ringed by mountains up to 9,000 feet high. The 325 acre campus is located in the center of the city with easy access to all its amenities. The University is an active and expanding institution of about 35,000 students, with a sizable number of internationally recognized departments and outstanding library facilities.

FOR APPLICATION INFORMATION WRITE:

Applicants should specifically mention that they are interested in the Joint Ph.D. Program in Anthropology and Linguistics.